Support Groups
Homeschoolers have created networks of support to provide a way to make friends, get ideas and information, and to offer positive socialization opportunties to their children. You can join in! There are many groups to choose from, many with specific affiliations, like Christian groups or unschoolers' groups. Some are eclectic, inclusive, and open to anyone. Whatever your interest, you are sure to find other like-minded parents. And if you don't find what you are looking for, we've put together tips for starting your own group.
Local & State Groups
Support groups offer a way for those interested in homeschooling or new to home education to get information and support. They also offer opportunities for social activities, group learning, and networking. Find a support group near you in Missouri.
National Groups
Tap into the national homeschool movement by connecting with these national homeschool groups and support organizations.
Email Groups & Lists
Connecting via email can be a life-line for anyone who is looking for support, guidance, information, and friendship. Many support groups rely on email lists to facilitate communication and to pass along information and ideas. Browse through these group to find some that might meet your needs.
Forums & Msg Boards
Message boards and forums are like the public squares of homeschooling. Come and find ongoing discussion covering every aspect of homeschooling imaginable.
Social Media
Connect with other homeschooling using social networking tools. You can share tips and ideas, get support, collaborate on lesson plans, upload photos, and much more.
Co-Ops
A co-op offers a way to share teaching duties with others who are excited and knowledgeable about a subject. It also offers an opportunity for your children to learn in a group and to make friends. Browse through this list of co-ops in Missouri.
Cover/Umbrella Schools
An umbrella or cover school provides an alternative way for parents to fulfill governmental educational guidelines and requirements. Most offer a variety of services, which can include curricula, social activities, field trips, standardized testing, portfolio reviews, evaluations, and graduation materials, including diplomas. While umbrella schools do tend to the needs of homeschoolers, they are considered a type of private school in most states.
Resource Centers
Homeschool resource centers offer classes, materials, field trips, and other activities for parents and children alike. They are great ways to get new information, engage in group activities, and network with other homeschoolers.
Public School Programs
Public schools are increasing offering programs to appeal to homeschooling families, from classes to educational materials to computer and distance learning. In most cases, students enrolled in these programs are considered public school students rather than homeschoolers. Learn more about these programs and decide if these are right for your family.
Group Management
Learn how to start and manage a homeschool support group, including how to stay organized, how to handle conflict, and ideas for your support group.
What's Popular
The Home-School Advantage
This New York Times articles is written by a veteran homeschooler who explains that home-schooling has a significant advantage in combating the pressure schools place on children, including better use of time and high quality academics. 
Helping Your Child Learn Mathematics
This booklet is made up of fun activities that parents can use with children from preschool age through grade 5 to strengthen their math skills and build strong positive attitudes toward math.
American Montessori Homeschoolers Co-op
A forum for communication for organized or established co-op's and individuals interested in organizing a Montessori Homeschool Co-op. Established Co-op's can share ideas and those interested in creating a co-op can get valuable advice and information.
A Day in the Life...
So….what is everyone really doing? Do you feel like the only one not going on a field trip today? You didn't feel up to building an exploding volcano? Check out what these home learners have shared during an average day in the life.
Home is Cool: Get Organized for Home School
Homeschool families, like Tolstoy’s happy ones, are all alike: drowning in a sea of clutter. Home schooling a child beats all other organizational challenges hands-down. How do you count the clutter? The books. The papers. The biology experiments on the kitchen window. The six-foot-tall child sprawled on the floor, reading. The record-keeping. College admissions and testing and letters from the correspondence school.
Featured Products

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Home Organizing Workbook: Clearing Your Clutter, Step-By-Step
Failing the Mary Poppins' snap-the-fingers approach to cleaning, here's the next best thing: an utterly practical handbook that offers lasting results for anyone looking to banish clutter from every room in the house. Home organizer par excellence Meryl Starr offers up her hardworking organizing solutions in The Home Organizing Workbook, a straightforward guide to getting organized. The room chapters begin with targeted questionnaires that help the reader identify specific organizational problem...
Homeschool Bravely: How to Squash Doubt, Trust God, and Teach Your Child with Confidence
It's time to change your perspective to transform the way you plan, teach, and homeschool. This book helps you to see homeschooling as a calling. With this mindset, you'll be able to dismiss the stress of impossible expectations. Find strategies to help you juggle the logistics of homeschooling with different ages, be a good support for a struggling learner, set realistic goals, dismiss the guilt, and weather any criticism. You can be a hopeful homeschooler! God uses all for good and can transfo...
The Complete Home Learning Source Book : The Essential Resource Guide for Homeschoolers, Parents, and Educators Covering Every Subject from Arithmetic to Zoology
This ambitious reference guide lives up to its name. Practically three inches thick--and we're not talking large print here--it's packed with titles, ordering information, and Web site addresses. From where to send away for a kit to make your own Chilean rain stick to how to order a set of Elizabethan costume paper dolls, the book connects families to a world of learning possibilities. Book titles, short synopses, authors' names, publishers, and years of print make up the bulk of the guide. Clas...
First Language Lessons for the Well-Trained Mind
Parents can assure their child's success in language arts with this simple-to-use, scripted guide. First Language Lessons for the Well-Trained Mind uses picture study and other classical techniques to develop the child's language study in those first two all-important years of school. Each lesson leads the parent, step-by-step, through the simple oral and written projects that build reading, writing, spelling, storytelling, and comprehension skills. Use this book to supplement school learning, o...
Discovery of the Child
Maria Montessori went beyond the conventions of the day to seek a new way of knowing and loving a child. In THE DISCOVERY OF THE CHILD, she describes the nature of the child and her method of working more fully with the child's urge to learn. With 16 pages of photographs.